radteen:

SO MUCH BUTTER

radteen:

SO MUCH BUTTER

(via newsweek)

mplstv:

Craft Dinner: Kari who concocted the ever-popular pizza flavored pizza has created a dinner made out of edible play-doh in celebration of National Play-Doh Day on September 18th, this Sunday. Recipes and process can be found here.

(via mplsco)

fastcompany:

Dutch designer Marije Vogelzang reinvents the eating experience.
The knitted casings of the Cuddly Sausage (pictured above) hope to draw a connection between the fuzzy animals we hold and the fuzzy animals we eat.
See more crazy pictures of what Vogelzang calls “food”

fastcompany:

Dutch designer Marije Vogelzang reinvents the eating experience.

The knitted casings of the Cuddly Sausage (pictured above) hope to draw a connection between the fuzzy animals we hold and the fuzzy animals we eat.

See more crazy pictures of what Vogelzang calls “food”

(via fastcompany)

Smores + Peaches

hclib:

Ju(i)cy Lucy

5-8 Club, 5800 Cedar Avenue

Matt’s Bar, 3500 Cedar Avenue

About 15 years ago I jumped in my friend’s Buick and was transported from my sheltered collegiate existence in St. Paul to the big city to have something called a “Jucy Lucy.”  It was quite the adventure for somebody that grew up in rural North Mankato.  The experience stuck with me, Matt’s became a regular weekend destination for me when I moved to Minneapolis.  Once on a Gophers-Wisconsin football Saturday, Matt’s was full of Badgers fans so we journeyed down Cedar Avenue to it’s rival, the 5-8 Club for Juicy Lucys.

I don’t recall my first 5-8 experience so recently I went there again, and ordered my Matt’s usual: Juicy Lucy with fried onions, fries, and a Grain Belt.

Here are my observations about both restaurants:

Matt’s pros: beautifully molten cheese between two patties, perfectly fried onions placed with the right quantity on the burger, tasty fries.

Matt’s cons: longer wait, slower service, strict serving etiquette (no ranch on the side, no ice in the water).

5-8 pros: shorter wait, mutiple locations, faster service, parking lot, patio, more diverse menu (more options for vegetarians), choice of cheese filling (classic American, Blue Cheese, Pepperjack or Swiss).

5-8 cons: cheese not totally melted, bun soaked with grease, fried onions sloppily cooked and placed on burger.

According to their website and menu, the 5-8 Club was originally a speakeasy, opening in 1928, a year after the former Richfield neighborhood became part of Minneapolis.  The speakeasy was in a house with a secret underground garage where the liquor could be brought in.  The top of the house was cut off later and another structure was added in 1934.  The timeline on the website says the Juicy Lucy was born in the 1950s. At the end of Prohibition in 1935, a bar operated by Serene Wagner was located at 5800 Cedar Avenue.

The building occupied by Matt’s Bar was built in 1915, it was originally a grocery store. Matt’s claims the Jucy Lucy was born in 1954 when a regular asked the cook to seal up some cheese between two patties.  The patron exclaimed, “that’s one juicy lucy!”  Matt’s has been serving them every since, with a creative spelling change.  A bar was first opened at 3500 Cedar Avenue in 1941, operated by Carl Laudenslager.  Minnesota Historical Society has some photos of the bar when it was know as Nib’s.

scanwiches:

5 Borough Bistro @ Google NYC: Olive Loaf, American Cheese, Pickles, Mayo, On Wheat Bread.

scanwiches:

5 Borough Bistro @ Google NYC: Olive Loaf, American Cheese, Pickles, Mayo, On Wheat Bread.

brit:

The Five Best Digital Recipe Boxes
As you may have noticed, I’ve been starting to cook a bit more lately. In doing so, I found that I needed a good place on the web to both discover new recipes, and to save some of my own.
After a week of scouring the interwebs for good online recipe apps, I’ve come up with my top five favorite sites to solve the problem.
Foodily - I just found this one today and am impressed with the clean and simple user experience and social capabilities. Though they don’t necessarily do anything new or unusual with the social features (you can heart things, share, etc), they have a leg up on the others simply due to the fact that they hook into your Facebook account. The one thing Foodily is missing is a place on the site where users can add their own recipes. Perhaps coming soon?
Plan to Eat - This site is great for adding recipes (both on your own and from around the web) and then mapping out your weekly meals with those recipes. Once you add recipes to your calendar, the site will auto-detect the ingredients and fill out a shopping list for you. The two big bummers about this site are: a) it’s hardly social, and b) it costs money, an obvious deterrent for a lot of people. I’m personally a fan of paying for services that I think add enough value to my life, but I’m not sold on this one just yet.
Gojee - Yes, I’ve already blogged about this one. But, it still remains one of my favorites as it is both beautiful and useful for figuring out what you can make with the ingredients already in your kitchen. I just have to be sure to eat BEFORE I play around on this site - otherwise, the delicious food pictures look way too tempting!
KeepRecipes - This site has the standard keep/add recipe functionality, and goes one step beyond with a Twitter-like feature that lets you “follow” popular chefs and food publishers (though there are only about a dozen so far). While there is a lot of interesting food content on the site, I wasn’t too impressed with the simplicity of the user experience. Like many of the others, they also aren’t using any sort of social integration for easy sharing among friends. Finally, the site was a bit slow for me, another hit on the user experience.
Pinterest - Even though it’s not necessarily a food/recipe site, many people told me that they used Pinterest to track things they wanted to cook. Social? Yes. Pretty? Yes. But, because it’s not a recipe site to start with, it doesn’t have structured fields to add your own recipes or to easily follow recipe directions. Gimme Bar could be a better solution, but as I said earlier today, I still haven’t formed a final opinion just yet.
So who is the winner? For me, Foodily seems most interesting. Now, someone just needs to convince them to add a personal recipe feature to the site and they’ll win my heart forever.

brit:

The Five Best Digital Recipe Boxes

As you may have noticed, I’ve been starting to cook a bit more lately. In doing so, I found that I needed a good place on the web to both discover new recipes, and to save some of my own.

After a week of scouring the interwebs for good online recipe apps, I’ve come up with my top five favorite sites to solve the problem.

  1. Foodily - I just found this one today and am impressed with the clean and simple user experience and social capabilities. Though they don’t necessarily do anything new or unusual with the social features (you can heart things, share, etc), they have a leg up on the others simply due to the fact that they hook into your Facebook account. The one thing Foodily is missing is a place on the site where users can add their own recipes. Perhaps coming soon?
  2. Plan to Eat - This site is great for adding recipes (both on your own and from around the web) and then mapping out your weekly meals with those recipes. Once you add recipes to your calendar, the site will auto-detect the ingredients and fill out a shopping list for you. The two big bummers about this site are: a) it’s hardly social, and b) it costs money, an obvious deterrent for a lot of people. I’m personally a fan of paying for services that I think add enough value to my life, but I’m not sold on this one just yet.
  3. Gojee - Yes, I’ve already blogged about this one. But, it still remains one of my favorites as it is both beautiful and useful for figuring out what you can make with the ingredients already in your kitchen. I just have to be sure to eat BEFORE I play around on this site - otherwise, the delicious food pictures look way too tempting!
  4. KeepRecipes - This site has the standard keep/add recipe functionality, and goes one step beyond with a Twitter-like feature that lets you “follow” popular chefs and food publishers (though there are only about a dozen so far). While there is a lot of interesting food content on the site, I wasn’t too impressed with the simplicity of the user experience. Like many of the others, they also aren’t using any sort of social integration for easy sharing among friends. Finally, the site was a bit slow for me, another hit on the user experience.
  5. Pinterest - Even though it’s not necessarily a food/recipe site, many people told me that they used Pinterest to track things they wanted to cook. Social? Yes. Pretty? Yes. But, because it’s not a recipe site to start with, it doesn’t have structured fields to add your own recipes or to easily follow recipe directions. Gimme Bar could be a better solution, but as I said earlier today, I still haven’t formed a final opinion just yet.

So who is the winner? For me, Foodily seems most interesting. Now, someone just needs to convince them to add a personal recipe feature to the site and they’ll win my heart forever.

(Source: brit)